Pharmacy sales – Fabrica De Cosas http://fabricadecosas.org/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 10:06:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://fabricadecosas.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-70x70.png Pharmacy sales – Fabrica De Cosas http://fabricadecosas.org/ 32 32 Streaming Anime Lifts Manga Sales https://fabricadecosas.org/streaming-anime-lifts-manga-sales/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 09:56:12 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/?p=844 Manga Publishers Manga publishers in North America had to make a tough decision about whether they would cut back on publishing books or hope that the pandemic will improve. But people found that they began reading more hanime manga on dateblocker.com (for hanime down, and even bought more while they were at their homes. The manga became […]]]>

Manga Publishers

Manga publishers in North America had to make a tough decision about whether they would cut back on publishing books or hope that the pandemic will improve. But people found that they began reading more hanime manga on dateblocker.com (for hanime down, and even bought more while they were at their homes. The manga became a lot more than just a bit.

NPD BookScan indicates that the manga buying spree will continue into 2021. Comparing to the same time in 2020, the U.S. printed manga popular sales increased by 3.6 Million units in the quarter that began in 2021.

“Last years was our best year ever, despite a pandemic, and the 2021 numbers have blown away,” Lianne Sentar, Seven Seas Entertainment’s marketing and sales manager, says. “Based upon what we’ve seen in the first few month, 2021 is going to be our biggest year ever–we’ve never seen numbers like this.”

Kevin Hamric (V-P, Publishing Sales at Viz Media) says that manga sales experienced a strong start in 2020 prior to the pandemic. However, manga sales plunged to “the lowest we’ve seen in years” in April. But he notes that the market soon recovered and has been moving upwards ever since. “Even with 2020 staying on the same track, 2021 has moved ahead. These last few weeks in 2021 have seen a rise in holiday 2020.

Kurt Hassler, the publisher and managing editor at Yen Press (a joint manga and graphic book venture between Hachette Publishers Kadokawa), also noted the buying trends. “For the first three quarters of 2021 we saw our sales functionally increase by twofold, which was well above what we had forecasted,” he states.

Kodansha USA Publishing reports similar results, according to Yae Sakashi, Kodansha’s vice president of sales marketing. She states, “Print manga sales rocketed up to a new peak over holiday 2020. After a plateau at the beginning of January, they rose even higher during March and April.” “Points of sale for the category have quadrupled since last year, even though you don’t consider the negative impact of Covid-19 in March.”

The anime effect

Why are sales increasing so much? Some experts believe this is due to a maturing market, where manga is part of mainstream pop-culture. This has placed the category at forefront of graphic book sales, if it doesn’t exceed overall book sales in North America. Others claim that the popularity of hanime streaming on platforms such as Amazon Prime and Hulu, Netflix, Crunchyroll and other anime-centric platforms Crunchyroll are increasing interest in manga’s source material, including print manga (illustrated prose works inspired by manga) and light novels.

Sahashi explains that online fan communities and anime are always the largest drivers of manga sale. “We believe there’s a renewed and excited interest anime, with new audiences coming in with each season. With platforms such as Netflix and Crunchyroll, anime is easy to access from anywhere and anytime. Many of the anime premiered right now were delayed due to the pandemic. It is possible that spring manga sales have outpaced holiday sales in part because of this delay.

Sentar states that anime is driving much of this industry, and it will continue its expansion as countries such as Japan and other countries tap into the hungry international market to adult animation.

According to Netflix’s 2020 Year in Review report, anime was one of the fastest growing genres. The company reported that there was a 100 percent increase in anime viewing in 2020. The anime boost has been most beneficial to the long-running favorite Attack on Titan. It is currently airing its final storyarc. Demon Slayer, which was inspired by a popular supernatural action manga series published in Shonen Jump/Viz, is also benefitting. A newly released feature-length film, Demon Slayer Mugen Train was the most popular in Japan. According to Polygon an online news site about pop culture , this film was released in North America to become the “biggest U.S. foreignlanguage box office debut” and earned $21.1million in its first weekend.

This surge in sales and fan fervor has benefited more than just the top manga franchises. It’s given a lift to older manga series, like Fruits Basket (first published English-language in the early 2000s), which has boosted backlist sales.

Mark de Vera (sales and marketing director at Yen Press) says that Fruits Basket does have new anime episodes airing. So its success today is no surprise. Fruits Basket is now selling more than the legendary shojo manga during the original’mangaboom’.

Boom or bubble

Manga has had many ups and downs since its early adoption by North American fans marketplaces in the 2000s. Manga accounted for almost two-thirds in graphic novels sales on the continent at one point during the mid-2000s. However, is this temporary growth a sign for long-term growth or just a temporary boost?

Hassler, who was a key chain retailer and graphic book buyer for manga during the earlier period, claims he’s always been wary of the term “manga boom” because it implies something similar to a bubble. “What we see now,” he states, “is very reminiscent of how this category performed in mid-2000s.” We have always believed that it was capable again of that level of performance, and it’s extremely satisfying to see it happen.”

Hamric stated, “I think there are many lessons from the past booms. And there doesn’t appear to be any rush to flood this market with more manga.”

Sahashi points out that “we think accessibility is key in both anime and manga.” Today, the gap between content consumer is nearly nonexistent. One difference between the current booms is that the majority of them are backlist-driven, while previous surges were frontlist-driven,” she said.

A surprising upside to the purchasing habits of pandemic survivors is the strength and longevity of older “evergreen”, manga titles. Hamric said that “Everything seems like it is selling right now” despite numerous physical bookstores closing at different points since spring 2020. “Our backlist sales percentage has significantly increased in the past one year,” he says. “Readers seem content to find the time to read the older series they have been wanting to. The frontlist sales are surpassing expectations, but the midlist as well as backlist sales have really taken off. Shonen titles (titles marketed to boys) are the most popular, as is anime tie in and horror manga. As I said, however, everything is up. This includes our shojo, BL [boys love], kids, literary titles, and series. All formats are selling well, especially our box sets.

Sahashi agrees with this statement: “Our sales suggest we’re noticing our strongest area in performance in our printed backlist and digital toplist.”

Hassler also noted that “the way retailers are supporting the category is responsible for the current sales increase.” He said, “All these are making it easier for readers to find or be introduced” to titles.

Diverse presses. Diverse titles

This is due to a revival of small and emerging manga publishers. Digital Manga Publishing, Drawn & Quarterly and Fanfare Ponent Mon, Fantagraphics Last Gasp, One Peace Books and Udon Entertainment offer smaller lists, but they help to diversify the market.

Drawn & Quarterly’s renowned manga artists Yoshiharu Suga and Shigeru Mizaki have published new titles this year. Udon Entertainment’s reprint of Riyoko’s beloved shojo work, Moto Hagio’s acclaimed sci-fi drama A Journal of My Father, Jiro Taniguchi’s touching historical drama of A Journal of My Father, and Tamosan’s The Date I Was Forcibly to Marry God and The Daily I Divorce God, a pair of her own stories about her experiences in Japan. There is something for every taste and interest.

Newcomer Square Enix Manga and Books has established its U.S. headquarters in New York City. It published several manga and novels in recent years, including My Dress Up Darling by Shinichi Fujita; Otherside Pinic, by Eita Mikuno and Iori Miyazawa. This sci-fi survival thriller features a girls’-love twist (the yuri-genre); and My Isekai: I Gainekai Life! Shinkoshoto about a worker who is transported to a dream world.

Kadakowa recently acquired J-Novel Club. It is both a digital publishing house and a subscription service. J-Novel Pulp will publish European pulp fiction. BDP Press has also been a micro publisher, as well as Cross Infinite Worlds and Glacier Bay Books. Starfruit Books, Starfruit Books, Sol Press, Sol Press and Kaiten Press all entered the market recently or increased their output.

Another promising trend is that readers are now buying more stories, different genres and art styles without any anime tie-ins. While shonen manga action/fantasy manga series are still popular, there is increased interest in and willingness to explore the many stories manga has to offer.

Sentar asserts that the North American market “is maturing.” There’s demand to all types of manga.

TokyoPop has been steadily adding titles to its boys’-love/girls’-love/romance imprint Love x Love, while Viz Media’s boys’-love imprint SubLime continues to rack up strong sales with such titles as Given and Birds of Shangri-La. Other notable LGBTQ releases are I Think our Son Is gay by Okura at Square Enix Manga and Books and My Alcoholic Escape form Realityby Nagata Kaki ( Lesbian Experience with Loneliness). All these titles will be available from Seven Seas. Denpa’s boys’-love imprint Kuma had strong sales for Wacoco Waco’s Can an Otaku, Like Me Really Be an Otaku Idol! Hyougo Kijima’s Wild, Wild, Wildlife, also getting a reprint after only three months.

Kodansha’s Boys Run the Riot series is getting a lot attention. The series features a trans coming of age/street fashion series by Keito Gaaku. Tiff Joshua Ferentini, U.S. editor of the four-volume tale, made sure that everyone on the localization teams was composed of trans people in order to share their perspective.

De Vera said, “Now more so than ever, there are many series that become bestsellers.” Today manga without an anime adaptation, and manga that fall in niche categories such as slice-of-life and boys’ loves, are selling at levels not possible for the mainstream shonen manga with their anime adaptations. It is very satisfying for manga fans to support a wider range.

You will also find a range of digital-only releases via subscription-based services and apps, such as Crunchyroll Manga. Mangamo. Manga Planet. Manga Plus. Shonen Jump.

Make your mark!

A renaissance is also occurring in North American manga sales. Original manga in Japanese stye has been published in North America by North American subsidiaries.

Viz Originals, a Viz imprint, was launched in 2019 to publish original graphic books by artists inspired by manga or anime. Viz announced a new copublishing partnership to Marvel Comics in order to release English versions of Marvel stories written in Japan. This partnership began in November with Marvel MEOW. Captain Marvel’s “cat”, Chewy was drawn by Nao Fu.

TokyoPop continues to license Disney-licensed manga, and also supports a small but growing list of original comics from a global group of creators. Seven Seas Entertainment is now partnering with HiveWorks as a graphic novel publisher, webcomic studio, and platform. They will publish many of their popular webcomics in print editions.

JuYoung Lee, editor in chief at Yen Press says that comics from South Korea are a regular part of the publishing mix. After years of working in South Korean comics, JuYoung joined the U.S. company in 2007. Lee said that BTS’s impact was significant and that Korean content is more ‘hip than ever. We’re getting lots of interest from retailers about what’s coming to Korea. Since its inception, webcomics has been a rapidly growing industry in Korea. In fact, it has exploded in the last few years. These webcomics platforms are now able to offer more than just individual creators. They can also set up digital comics studios that produce high quality content in a shorter time frame to meet the growing demand of readers who want quick access to their next story. It is incredible how much content they can produce and how high the quality.

Lee explains that manhwa, which is South Korean comics, was first published in America ten years back. “That was the only way to market Korean content,” Lee says. “People are looking for stories from Korea now, which is a significant difference.”

Problems in supply chains

Even with such remarkable growth, selling more books can cause more problems. Pandemic-related delays in shipping and printing have led to shortages for manga, despite the fact that demand is increasing.

Hamric stated that “we just can’t obtain all the books which we want to reproduce right now, but the demand from our readers is higher than ever,”

Hassler of Yen Press concurs: “Printer capacities were stretched last Year, and the rise in sales this year have exacerbated these problems.”

Sentar laments that this will be a problem in the coming months because demand isn’t slowing down. We understand that this is a difficult problem to have but we feel sorry for readers and retailers who will have to wait longer in order to receive print copies.

Ed Chavez from Denpa Manga House, an indie manga publisher, stated that “Even at 2019’s start, we were experiencing two to three additional weeks for our first printings.” Beginning in fall 2020 we noticed delays of between four and six weeks from domestic printers.

The publishers are faced with difficult decisions and adjustments because of their limited print production. Hassler comments, “The initial adjustment was to try to get ahead those titles that have so much demand right now that we cannot keep up with it, seemingly regardless of how many we print.”

Hamric from Viz Media states that they have to make decisions every week about what we can reprint, and what needs to wait. We stay in constant contact with our suppliers to find other solutions. The situation is well known by the retailers, since it is an industry-wide concern and not limited to one category. At this point, I don’t see how it will be resolved in the next year.

Look ahead

Many comics conventions, such as anime, are either virtual only or waiting to see if the number of people vaccinated increases and lockdown restrictions decrease. The manga publishers we spoke with are generally optimistic but remain skeptical about the future.

Viz’s Hamric states that he believes that the upward sales trend will persist, but that it could be interrupted by the way we open up the nation, how people spend money, and how long it takes for the printer issues to stop.

Hassler said, “We don’t anticipate any end in sight to the strong sales in the category right now.” I believe the rate at which growth is occurring will taper because it is difficult to maintain 100% exponential growth. But I don’t think this will be a short-lived spike.

Kodansha’s Sahashi writes, “We feel very blessed and excited to be publishing during a time when enthusiasm and interest in anime and manga is at its highest.” We have many upcoming and current series that we are excited to share with fans searching for manga content.

Seven Seas Sentar states that “our top titles are spread across many genres. And demand for everything is up for both print and digital formats.” While there will be some fluctuations in demand due to the global adjustment to Covid-19 this year, I believe that most of this growth is going to continue. It’s been quite a year. But we still have plenty of cooking to share.


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Peach Boy Riverside – The Summer 2021 Preview Guide https://fabricadecosas.org/peach-boy-riverside-the-summer-2021-preview-guide/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 09:54:41 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/?p=832 What is this? Once upon a time, there was an old man and an old woman in a certain land. The old man went to the mountains to cut the grass, and the old woman went to the river to wash clothes, when she came across a giant peach with a baby floating by. And […]]]>


What is this?

Once upon a time, there was an old man and an old woman in a certain land. The old man went to the mountains to cut the grass, and the old woman went to the river to wash clothes, when she came across a giant peach with a baby floating by. And the long story short, the Japanese demon-fighting folk-tale hero Momotarō was born. But there’s more to the story. There were many such peaches besides the one that floated to Japan. Much later, Momotarō did eventually vanquish the demons threatening his home, but still more demons are said to roam in foreign lands, so Momotarō set off across the sea.

Peach Boy Riverside adapts Coolkyoushinja and Johanne‘s manga of the same name and streams on Crunchyroll on Thursdays.


How was the first episode?

Richard Eisenbeis
Rating:



It’s funny. I don’t think I’ve ever actually read the Momotaro fairy tale, though I’ve certainly learned the basic story through cultural osmosis. An elderly couple finds a giant peach. In the middle, instead of a seed, they find a child. They raise the boy, Momotaro, as their own and eventually he heads off to the island, Onigashima, and fight the ogres that reside there with his animal companions. Apparently, Peach Boy Riverside is a pseudo-sequel to that story. Yet, instead of following Momotaro, it follows Sally—a princess with a similar origin who shares Mototaro’s penchant for ogre fighting.

This episode starts us somewhere in the middle of the story, after her meeting with another “Momotaro” and an “encounter” with an octopus. Sally gains her first companion in the form of Frau, a rabbit demihuman, and learns a bit about the world outside her kingdom—namely that everyone is super racist. In this world, demihumans are treated as no better than monsters, and even should a demihuman prove itself a protector of humans, humans still fear and shun it for its natural physical power. In other words, the basic moral of the story so far is “racism is bad” which, while admirable, is rather simplistic.

Beyond that, I’m a bit baffled by the schizophrenic tone of the episode. We have a cute comedy between Sally and Frau, the aforementioned social commentary on racism, some questionable fanservice involving Sally, and then some good-old ultraviolence when the Ogres show up and start ripping people apart. If the episode is keeping me off balance by design, then the series is certainly off to a strong start here—though I’m not sure what the point of doing so would be.

If there was one thing I enjoyed about the episode, it was the background music. It sounds like much of it is being played by a gamelan orchestra (an Indonesian traditional orchestra). In the fight against the ogre chicken, the drums, vocals, and what appears to be a gendèr form a haunting melody. Then, in the final fight scene, a sitar and electric keyboard are added to the gendèr, resulting in a song that sounds like it was ripped straight out of Chrono Trigger‘s Kingdom of Zeal. I don’t know how much more of the series I will watch, but I’ll certainly keep my eyes peeled for the OST.


Kim Morrissy
Rating:



I have mixed feelings about the anime’s decision to air the episodes out of chronological order. It wasn’t that this first episode was particularly difficult to follow – in fact, the plot is rather simple – but it fails to introduce any emotional stakes or even a reason to continue watching. The idea that there could be multiple Momotaros from the Japanese folktale is interesting in the abstract, but in practice it only amounted to the typical narrative setup of a character who is seemingly ordinary at the start of the episode revealing their superpowers at the end of it.

The fantasy setting and the subplot about demihuman racism are similarly uninspired. The bunny girl Frau fits all the template characteristics of the sympathetic demihuman. She might be stronger than your average human, but she’s also friendly, docile, and deeply loyal to the first person to show her basic kindness. The only thing that really stands out about her is that she looks more bunny than human, as opposed to your typical hanime bunny girl who is just a conventionally attractive human woman with a cosplay accessory.

The only other distinctive thing about this episode is its bafflingly inconsistent tone. Juvenile tentacle and boob jokes are immediately followed by surprisingly explicit violence. But then it’s all carried out by a smirking villain that looks like a walrus, so it wraps all the way back around to being juvenile again. Ultimately, none of the events of this episode had any weight. If there is a reason to keep watching, it’s to see if the anime’s adaptation decisions end up coming together by the end, but so far I’m not impressed.


Nicholas Dupree
Rating:



Right off the bat, Peach Boy Riverside‘s got tone problems. While being able to handle a broad spectrum of emotions and atmosphere is a good thing to show off in your opening episode, here it comes across not as a demonstration of range, but a scattershot approach to storytelling that leaves this whole thing feeling like less than the sum of its already questionable parts.

For one, you have the typical fantasy racism subplot that dominates the first two-thirds of this premiere. The whole concept of humans discriminating against non-humans is frankly played out, and unless you’ve got some really interesting ideas it’s usually better to just not make Orc Racism or whatever a thing in your fantasy world. It only gets more questionable here, where our only example is people fearing Frau, the most obvious mascot character ever. It’s hard to take this whole storyline seriously when it’s people acting distrustful and terrified over a chibi-faced rabbit girl in a middle school uniform whose entire MO is eating carrots. With all of that, the show’s signaling it definitely doesn’t have anything meaningful to say about the nature of prejudice, and it makes the opening half of this episode feel like a slog.

Things do pick up after that, but also introduce a different host of problems separate from the worldbuilding. While our central characters are likable enough – Sally and Frau are at their best when they guilt trip Hawthorn into buying them lunch – they’re not particularly compelling or interesting, and outside of basic compassion it was hard to muster up any worry about either of them getting mauled by the giant walrus monster. More immediately, the action animation just isn’t there. Of the short fights we get in this premiere, the strongest is when Frau kicks a giant chicken in the first half, with everything else feeling vaguely disjointed and poorly structured. Production values in general are middling to poor, with this premiere bottoming out on the aforementioned walrus whose mouth doesn’t even move when he speaks. Add in some random tentacle fanservice that comes out of nowhere before leaving just as quickly, and this premiere left me scratching my head rather than pumping my fist.

There’s plenty of room in the world and my heart for schlock, but that also means there’s enough room for some pulp to float to the surface while some sink to the bottom. Peach Boy Riverside feels decidedly like the latter. This could potentially develop into an indulgent and bloody spectacle that gets its ideas straight, but I have little confidence after this premiere.


Rebecca Silverman
Rating:



Have you ever started a new series and had the thought, “Did I miss something? Is this a sequel?” That’s
basically where Peach Boy Riverside‘s debut left me. Technically speaking, it kind of is a sequel to the
folktale Momotaro, but rather than that being the issue (which would be a nonissue, really, Momotaro
having long since entered into the public consciousness), it’s more a case of a largely failed attempt at
starting in medias res: in the middle of the story. Therefore, we don’t get any information about why
Sally is wandering the countryside, who Mikoto is or why she’s looking for him, or when she was
apparently molested by a giant octopus. Instead, we just jump right into her meeting Frau.

Who is Frau? If you go by appearances, she’s the spawn of Bugs Bunny and a Sanrio character, but more
to the point in the story, they’re a type of demi-human – a harefolk. When Sally meets them, they have
passed out from hunger, and after Sally offers them some carrots, they announce their intention of
sticking with her to pay off their “carrot debt.” It’s a fairly typical trope in folklore: the protagonist feeds
or otherwise gives someone what they need, and the one they helped promises to help them in return.
Keeping bits and pieces of the original folklore is one of the things this episode does right, with its
closing – where someone recites the opening lines of Momotaro and then muses about whether or not
there were more peaches sent downriver – being the most effective parts. It’s also worth noting that
there is a Japanese folktale about a girl who is found inside a melon floating downriver, Uriko-hime and
Amanojaku. I don’t think that’s being used here, as it’s a bit obscure, but it does feature in the visual
novel Adabana Odd Tales if you want to see another take on the concept.

Peach Boy Riverside is trying. We’re clearly meant to be interested in whatever Sally’s backstory is, and
why her eye glows around ogres, especially when you realize that it’s the same eye that ogre girl Meki
can use to blow stuff up. (Meki’s eye, however, is much less firmly anchored in her face.) But mostly this
episode feels like it struggles from trying to be too many things: it’s a reworking of a folktale, a
statement on how humans are unreasonably prejudiced (specifically against demi-humans), a grim war
story with plenty of gore, and a jigglefest where Sally is concerned…sometimes. Even the fanservice
feels very uneven, as if the episode isn’t quite sure what to do with all of its moving parts. Now, the
manga this is based on is available in English translation, and I don’t know if having read that would
make this episode more appealing, or at least make more sense. But from where I’m sitting, based on
this episode Frau’s the only thing it really has going for it, and even she’s not enough to make me
wholeheartedly recommend it.


James Beckett
Rating:



Peach Boy Riverside‘s premiere is an exceedingly odd one. For the whole of its first half, I had a very
hard time nailing down its tone and direction, especially considering the very simple setup we’re given
for its premise: The so-called “Ex-Princess” of the episode’s title is Saltherine, who thankfully goes by
Sally as she travels the world in search of a mysterious boy named Mikoto. One day, she offers a carrot
to a rabbit demihuman dressed in a Japanese schoolgirl outfit, because of course. The creature’s name is
Frau, and what she lacks in linguistic skills she makes up for in bravery and fighting prowess. Together,
Frau and Sally fight monsters and continue Sally’s pursuit of her long-lost friend.

Simple enough, right? And that simplicity was what lulled me into the false state of secure boredom that
eventually threw me for a loop. The lackadaisical pace and low-key stakes of the episode sure don’t feel
like the opening chapter of a grand adventure, but there is just a bit too much action and drama for it to
qualify as some sort of slice-of-life episode. The central conceit of Sally and Frau forming a cross-species
bond of unbreakable friendship is cute enough, but everything else about their characterization and
place in this world just feels so…vague.

It also doesn’t help that the design of Peach Boy Riverside‘s world is almost painfully generic. The stock
standard monster designs don’t make for particularly interesting foils to the plain human cast (except
for Frau, who’s conspicuously cartoonish proportions and mannerisms certainly stand out). The setting
is genuinely indistinguishable from any of the knock-off fantasy RPG type anime and light novels that
have been flooding the bargain bins for the last thirty years, too — you could insert random bits of
footage from, say, Death March to The Parallel World Rhapsody or I’ve Been Killing Slimes for 300 Years
or what have you, and I don’t know if anyone would be able to tell the difference.

Then, a funny thing happens. After being rescued from bigoted knights by a fellow named Hawthorn,
Sally and Frau are taken to the city of Rimdarl, where the following events happen literally within the
span of maybe two minutes:

  • Sally is offered an octopus at the market, which causes her to envision a weirdly explicit scenario of
    tentacle-hentai fondling
  • A pair of ogres named Meki and Sett arrive and blow up a chunk of the market, brutally murdering a
    bunch of civilians in front of Sally
  • We learn that the lady ogre turns into a loli when she fires her laser because of…reasons.
  • The other ogre smashes a bunch of soldiers to death in a scene of incredible violence and gore
  • Sally is overcome with bloodlust, while the narrator reminds the audience of the Japanese fable of
    Momotaro, the ogre-slaying Peach Boy, and posits that perhaps there were many such children sent out
    into the world that day.

It’s a…dramatic shift in tone and energy, to say the least. I don’t even know how much I can say I liked it,
since the show’s mediocre production values and sleight writing still leave a lot to be desired, but I’d be
lying if I said my curiosity wasn’t just a little piqued. I’ll give Peach Boy Riverside another episode or two, just to see if it ends up being weird enough to stick around for. Just don’t go into it expecting the next
great anime of the summer or anything.


Caitlin Moore
Rating:



Procrastination has once again worked in my favor, because I started up this episode armed with knowledge that my fellow reviewers did not have: the first episode of Peach Boy Riverside to air is not the first chronologically. I didn’t expect to understand what was going on, and that honestly made the episode much easier to swallow.

Not that what’s here is hard to suss out. Protagonist Sally, with improbably-large jugs for her small frame and surprisingly practical clothes (relatively speaking, of course), encounters a carrot-obsessed bunny girl named Frau. Frau breaks the mold for bunny girl designs, with a lanky frame, sailor suit, long scarf, and cartoonish spherical head with only two eyes for features. I was surprised by this choice; bunny girls are such low-hanging fruit for fan service series that they’re rotting on the ground, and it was refreshing to see it go in a different direction.

The story beats around her, however, were positively moldy. Oh no, she’s a powerful demihuman feared by humans even though she’s harmless! And then she saves them but that display of strength just makes them fear her more! But Sally was nice to her and stuck up for her, which means Frau is now extremely devoted to her, and I am tired. Fantasy racism is an extraordinarily shallow and overdone metaphor, usually tying up into a pat, “Be nice and don’t judge people!” conclusion straight out of a children’s book. So, let’s just not anymore, okay?

Without a plot to focus on, I found myself zeroing in on small details, like the characters’ clothing. There’s some boob nonsense with Sally — I laughed out loud when she was sitting abject in prison, pushing her knockers forward with her arms — and while she may be wearing wet-look latex leggings, they actually crease and hang like actual fabric. Hawthorn’s sweater looked downright cozy. If the series ever gains enough popularity to attract cosplayers, I’m sure they’ll appreciate the “if.”

That’s a big “if,” because to be honest, I’m not sure whether it has the potential to attract a following. Part of it is, of course, the aforementioned choice to slice and dice the story out of order. There’s also a bizarre level of tonal whiplash — seeing an octopus in the marketplace makes Sally imagine (or remember?) getting sexually assaulted by tentacles, reminding me that this is indeed a coolkyoushinsha series. A bloodless fight early in the episode left me unprepared for seeing soldiers get graphically, gorily obliterated in the second half. And I straight-up have no idea about the larger plot yet.

Watching Peach Boy Riverside wasn’t a miserable experience or anything, but it probably says something that the part I was most interested in was the way the characters’ clothing was drawn, since I’m really only mildly interested in fabric and fibers.

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The Influence of Anime on the Mexican Underground https://fabricadecosas.org/the-influence-of-anime-on-the-mexican-underground/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 09:53:42 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/?p=838 SCENE REPORT It’s February of 2020, and the sun is setting on Mexico City’s gargantuan Electric Daisy Carnival, when the screens at the massive Dos Equis stage are suddenly overtaken by bouncing Pikachus and dancing hanime school girls. The surreal sight is immediately followed by dizzyingly pitched-up vocals and the booming kick and high-hat combo […]]]>

SCENE REPORT

It’s February of 2020, and the sun is setting on Mexico City’s gargantuan Electric Daisy Carnival, when the screens at the massive Dos Equis stage are suddenly overtaken by bouncing Pikachus and dancing hanime school girls. The surreal sight is immediately followed by dizzyingly pitched-up vocals and the booming kick and high-hat combo of reggaetón, which means Army of Skanks have finally taken over the decks. The duo of Pat Ana Castellanos (aka Sugar Mami) and Cepillo Cuevas are decked out in sparkly makeup and iridescent sportswear, quickly winning over the crowd with their quirky collisions of Nintendo samples and raunchy lyrics about otaku heartbreak and twerking Kirbys, which they’ve lovingly christened “perreo hentai.” Strange as it may have seemed, the performance reflected a number of contemporary hallmarks in Mexican culture; from the chart-topping dominance of reggaetón to cutting-edge meme culture and the ubiquitous presence of hanime and manga.

“I cried. I couldn’t believe we were playing such a large stage,” says Cuevas, who began producing at the height of the moombahton explosion of the late ‘00s, going on to collaborate with genre pioneer Dave Nada of Hermanito Label. “There is a big otaku culture here,” he adds. “I usually extract sound files directly from my game library, but even before, when I started DJ-ing perreos, I used to play that ‘Saint Seya’ parody [‘Siente Mi Cosmos Mami’] and it was always a hit because of the culture clash of Japan and Mexico. Anime and video games have always been a staple, but now musicians are playing with an element of nostalgia that makes it even more exciting.”

Indeed, in recent years, nostalgia, nerdy humor, and innovation have resulted in a new subculture in Mexico’s underground, one that pops up everywhere from electronic music niches to campy queer circles. In 2019, Monterrey DJ and producer Nurrydog bookended his own EDC appearance with a reggaetón rework of the Neon Genesis Evangelion theme song, “Zankoku Na Tenshi No Tēze.” Step into any record store today, and you’re guaranteed to find a fully stocked J-pop aisle, the love for which has also stimulated a growing future funk scene nationwide. And right up until the Covid-19 pandemic sent nightlife into indefinite hiatus, the FrikiPerreo party series was rapidly gaining a cult following in Mexico City’s Zona Rosa district, with a unique blend of Top 40 hits, old school classics, and cosplaying drag queens.

Anime in particular is extremely popular across Latin America, but it has a special significance in Mexico, with a history dating back nearly 60 years. In 1964, Astroboy was the first Japanese animated series to be dubbed and broadcast in Mexico, becoming a fixture of network television and followed in subsequent years by Speed Racer and Captain Tsubasa. The shows played daily across pillars of Mexican free-to-air television like Televisa, and later TV Azteca, piping Japanese animation into millions of households, completely free of charge. This made anime accessible to all, regardless of origin or economic status, and ingrained the art form into the collective consciousness of Mexico‘s youth. The egalitarian model was soon adopted across the continent, in the process infusing anime with distinctly Latin American texture. Shōjo classic Candy Candy (1975-79) was dubbed into unmistakable Argentine Spanish; over in Miami, Mazinger Z (1972-73) showcased an international voice cast that reflected the show’s universe-spanning plot and characters. Large Japanese diasporas in Peru and Brazil were also quick to embrace anime, as rapidly growing syndication blocks paved the way for Latin America’s golden age of anime and manga in the ‘90s.

Gaby Maya—aka Gaby Manga—was a trailblazer of manga publication in Mexico, co-founding popular fanzine Animanga in the mid ’90s alongside Adalisa Zarate. A force within the industry between 1992 and 2004, Maya got her start brokering licensing deals for Saint Seya coloring books, later leading teams at Editorial Toukan and Editorial Mango, where she secured publishing and distribution rights for titles such as Dragon Ball Z, Sailor Moon, Ranma ½, One Piece, Cardcaptor Sakura, Pokémon, Digimon, and even Power Rangers. According to Maya, anime resonated with Mexican audiences for a number of reasons, including the fact that its stories typically mirrored shared family values between Mexico and Japan; they had strong messages of resilience, and the narrative archetypes echoed the format of popular telenovelas.

“The plot of every anime is ongoing and never limited to the monster of the week,” she says. “We all know Goku [from Dragon Ball Z] is going to fight the next universal threat that comes along, but you also get to grow with him from childhood through adolescence, into fatherhood and even grandfatherhood. Every character has their own storyline that keeps you hooked for years, so there’s always learning and maturity on the screen. Plus, having to constantly overcome adversity really speaks to us. Remi from Nobody’s Boy was like a lightning rod of bad luck, but the theme song was always encouraging him, and us, to move forward. It’s a message we all needed to hear at the time—especially since the show was airing in the mid-1980s and coincided with the earthquake of 1985, which devastated millions.”

But not everyone was convinced of the inspiring power of Saint Seya, Sailor Moon and their ilk. In the mid ’00s, TV Azteca talking head Lolita de la Vega emerged as a fierce enemy of anime, which she labeled as “satanic and corrupting the youth” for its depictions of nudity and its crass humor. Her views gained the support of numerous parental organizations leading to the steady decline of anime on network television—with the notable exception of Dragon Ball Z, which has remained too popular to be removed from the broadcast schedule. Cable channels like Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, and Fox Kids jumped in to fill the gap, offering popular shows like Pokémon, Digimon, and Yu-Gi-Oh!, attracting a new generation of fans. Around the same time, anime malls called Friki Plazas began sprouting up in every major city across Mexico, followed by the Mecca-like draw of conventions La Mole, La CONVE, and Expo TNT, all of which provided safe, nurturing spaces for legions of frikis and otakus. The rise of the Internet made access to anime even broader thanks to YouTube and Crunchyroll, simultaneously fostering an unexpected ecosystem for original content.

Anime and manga creators have been encouraging of the movement. Mexico City’s La Mole welcomed hentai pioneer Toshio Maeda in 2018, and Satoshi Shiki (Kamikaze, Riot, Attack on Titan: Before The Fall) the following year. São Paulo’s enormous CCXP has also attracted a number of mangakas, like Tsutomu Nihei (Blame!, Knights of Sidonia) and executive vice president of Toei Animation, Kozo Morishita, (Dragon Ball, Saint Seya, Digimon), both in 2016. In a way, Latin America has earned special attention from these foundational figures because broadcasters respected the original format of their mangas and shows, cultivating a more profound and organic connection, versus the heavy editing and censorship their work was subjected to entering the US market. The region has also served as inspiration for a number of shows like Yoshikito Inamoto’s Nazca, which takes place during the fall of the Incan Empire, and Studio Manglobe’s buddy adventure Michiko & Hatchin, which was stylized to look like it was set in Brazil.

“The way I see it, if I’m having a good time, we all are,” says YouTube star Elvakeroporno (The Porno Cowboy), who has gained a loyal following through wildly inventive reggaetón and corrido fantasies centering hanime favorites. With the added charm of his pronounced Monterrey cowboy drawl, Elvakeroporno first achieved virality with “El Corrido de Black Goku,” which he uploaded to YouTube and was later surprised to find blasting from his coworker’s phone. From there his channel flourished; his most popular creations include “El Corrido de Death Note,” which he performs as an outlaw folk tale from the perspective of villainous lead character Kira, and the ongoing Caballeros del Reggaeton series based off a Saint Seya meme from several years ago, yielding the now legendary earworm “Siente Mi Cosmos Mami.” “It was this joke about Saint Seya‘s Greatest Hits,” he adds with a chuckle, “which never actually existed, but I just thought about the dynamite possibilities.”

Elvakeroporno joins the ranks of Los Weyes Que Tocan (“El Poketribal”), Lalothing (“El Corrido de All Might”) and Maryan MG (“La Cumbia del Otaku”) within a pantheon of YouTube creatives who’ve elevated quirky parodies into refined and endlessly quotable originals that do much more than lampoon the source material. “Sometimes people tell me the parodies should make me mad,” reflects Gaby Maya. “But on the contrary, that’s precisely what it means to adapt something foreign into your own culture. That’s the proof we have fully adopted this art.”

These 10 artists offer a closer look at the many ways love for anime and Japanese culture are manifesting in the Mexican underground.

Sailorfag

Queer agitator, beauty influencer, and raunchy reggaetón enchantress Sailorfag has emerged as a viral tour de force, colliding cutting edge fashion with hysterical songs about toxic masculinity and failing relationships. Early singles “Polo Acartonada” and “Amiga Date Cuenta” gave the world a glimpse into what would happen if Hatsune Miku became a Batman villain, later exploring the kawaii spectrum on singles “konnichiwatontas” and the Powerpuff Girls-inspired “Bad Girls Go To Cancun.” Late last year, Sailorfag released a dark new anthem titled “gotiK (papi papito),” diving into Mexican goth culture and even releasing a music video emulating classic RPGs like Final Fantasy and Pokémon.

Macross 82-99

One of Mexico’s trailblazers of future funk, Macross 82-99 has cultivated a loyal following both at home and in Asia by harnessing pop nostalgia and infusing it with the raw vitality of internet culture. Deriving his name from Robotech‘s popular Macross Saga, the producer has released a series of cult records including Sailorwave I & II and Summer Touch, where J-pop and disco samples meet ambient atmospheres and vaporwave aesthetics. Macross 82-99 is part of the Sailor Team collective alongside producers Night Tempo, Nanidato and Desired, and in recent years has begun delving into harder club sounds heard on his latest album Shibuya Meltdown.

Kodomo Gun

On Christmas Day of 2019, mysterious Monterrey punks Kodomo Gun unleashed their self-titled debut EP, clocking in at under 10 minutes long and delivering a kawaii kick straight to the teeth. Tracks like “Tsunami” and “Robot” fuse chainsaw guitars with cutesy vocals, consecrating the band as a standout of the city’s thriving punk scene. Kodomo Gun come alive on the stage and will have you diving into the pit with a grin, so keep an eye on their Instagram page for post-pandemic show announcements.

Army of Skanks

Army of Skanks are on the edge of glory, rapidly establishing themselves as a refreshing new voice of the reggaetón underground with high-profile festival bookings, and preparing the release of their debut EP later this spring. Maximalists to a T, their songs feature a bevy of video game and anime samples ranging from Mario Kart snippets to Pokémon characters like Pikachu and Togepi, heard at their finest on singles “Perreame Konnichi Wa!” and “Pikachu Quiere Perrear.” Their forthcoming EP Ejercito de Inventadas promises a parade of high-octane collabs, including a crossover with folk-pop crooner Mi Sobrino Memo and a fiery feature from rising perreo boss Charly Gynn.

Future Otaku

Mexico City’s Future Otaku is part of the growing tidal wave of homegrown future funk and vaporwave wizards, cutting his teeth alongside the likes of Macross 82-99, Sentidos Apuestos, and Cibereality. The prolific producer has released a slew of albums, independently and with popular genre labels like Neo Motel and PLAYAWAVE, showing an affinity for samples of classic disco and funk records by Michael Jackson, Earth Wind and Fire, and more. Spend some time with his expansive SPACE.EXE and Future Idols LPs for an unrelenting party that will keep you spinning deep into the night.

Makoto Kino

Mexico City electronic artist Makoto Kino has been a fixture of the experimental underground for years, bringing drone and noise to life with influences from the Japanese idol scene and deconstructed club sounds. Their namesake, the civilian identity of Sailor Jupiter, is meant to represent a balance of strength and vulnerability beautifully captured on their 2016 debut album Eternal Loss where samples of moans and gasps create an atmosphere of sexual tension and intimacy. Makoto Kino’s 2020 follow-up, Glitter Rose Garden, trades sensuality for an unshakeable air of restlessness, transforming tracks like “West Madoka” and “Hànzì Semiotics” into elegant, unsettling pieces of sound design.

Aku P

Diving into the infinite waters of Vocaloid and UTAU software, Aku P has developed a signature sound by melding influences from hyperpop, chiptune, punk, and digitally synthesized vocals that give his releases an otherworldly, almost video game quality. His 2016 debut EP, My Reality, was a sonically abrasive mission statement full of cyborg vocals, sticky sweet synths, and pounding drums, later softened on singles “Azúcar” and “Café Molcajeteado.” Versatile and adventurous, Aku P produced the beat for Sailorfag’s viral 2019 single “Terrible, Perriemos,” applying the same voice modulating techniques used in his extensive catalogue and giving the reggaetón star the Dance Dance Revolution anthem of their dreams.

Trillones & Mary Chan

Mexicali producer Trillones has enjoyed a long and prolific career, steadily evolving from the most cerebral kid on the block into a meme-savvy dance music savant. In late 2019, he linked up with local newcomer Mary Chan—whose name is an alliteration of the popular cup of noodle soup brand—and began concocting quirky otaku perreo bangers as a pair. On their first collaborative single, “Ninja Way,” Mary Chan boldly proclaimed herself as our new perreo sensei while Trillones crafted a canvas of wild reggaetón infused with club production and a cartoonish bassline. Their follow up, “Perreo Kawaii,” is even more in your face, keeping instrumentation sparse but delivering a neck-braking thumper with a late beat change into grinding, old school reggaetón vibes. While both artists are maintaining solo careers, the singles are destined for a weeb-tastic EP expected for release later this year.

DΛRKNΣSS

Hailing from Tecate, Baja California, DΛRKNΣSS has been on a nonstop production rampage since 2019, constantly uploading new cuts and compilations that showcase her philosophical meditations on life, death, and the anxieties in between. Her brand new album, Echoes of Crime, is a great introduction to her multifaceted, usually chill influences encompassing ambient, lo-fi beats and jazz samples. But don’t sleep on earlier releases like 東京の悲しい早朝3… and Suicide Hotline, where convulsive shifts from drone to future funk will keep you on your toes.

Jesse Cassettes

Chihuahua’s Jesse Cassettes is another future funk producer playing up the nostalgia game, but unlike most of his peers who favor Asian source material, we are instead treated to clever re-imaginings of Latin pop classics. Last year’s “90’s, Moda, Rock&Roll (Ft. Iden Kai)” is a hyper-caffeinated spin on an ’80s Fandango classic, while his L U I S M I W 4 V E series puts a recurring, futuristic lens on the enduring legacy of Mexican pop icon Luis Miguel. Jesse Cassettes stands beside producers like Magiobus and Popcornkid!, who through their own experimental idiosyncrasies are revitalizing Chihuahua’s gravely overlooked electronic scene.

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Stream on Demand: the life of Colin Kaepernick in ‘Black & White’ https://fabricadecosas.org/stream-on-demand-the-life-of-colin-kaepernick-in-black-white/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 00:03:50 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/stream-on-demand-the-life-of-colin-kaepernick-in-black-white/ What’s new for home viewing on Video on Demand and Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, Disney +, HBO Max, and other streaming services. Best streams of the week “Colin in black and white” (TV-14) features football legend Colin Kaepernick’s high school years and the experiences that inspired him to become an activist. Kaepernick recounts the six-episode […]]]>

What’s new for home viewing on Video on Demand and Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, Disney +, HBO Max, and other streaming services.

Best streams of the week

“Colin in black and white” (TV-14) features football legend Colin Kaepernick’s high school years and the experiences that inspired him to become an activist. Kaepernick recounts the six-episode limited series he created with Ava DuVernay. (Netflix)

The drama of basketball “Swagger” (TV-MA) with O’Shea Jackson Jr. and Isaiah Hill draws on NBA superstar Kevin Durant’s experiences as a young baseball player on and off the field. Three episodes available, new episodes on Friday. (Apple TV +)

Tony-winning Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hanime musical is brought to screen by director Jon M. Chu in “In the heights” (2021, PG-13), with Anthony Ramos in the role created by Miranda. It’s back on HBO Max.

Stuff for Kids: A crew of intergalactic teens heads to space aboard an abandoned Starfleet ship in the animation “Star Trek: Prodigy” (TV-Y7), the first original “Star Trek” series created for young viewers. Kate Mulgrew reprise her role as Cpt. Janeway. (Paramount +)

Halloween Highlights

Young woman (Kate Siegel) finds her intense hypnotherapy sessions have deadly consequences in “Hypnotic” (TV-14). (Netflix)

“Paranormal activity: next of kin” (2021, R), the seventh film in the found footage horror series, hits theaters and debuts on Paramount +.

Anthology of Horror “Black Horror” (2021, unrated) features short films by black directors and screenwriters, and the documentary series “Behind the monsters” (unrated) explores modern horror icons from Freddy Krueger to Candyman. (Thrill and AMC +)

Pay-Per-View / Video on demand

Matt Damon is an American thug in Marseille to help his daughter, who is in prison for a murder she did not commit, in “Still water” (2021, R). Another novelty:

supervillain action sequel “The suicide squad” (2021, R) with Margot Robbie, Idris Elba and John Cena;

horror sequel “Don’t breathe 2” (2021, R) with Stephen Lang. All on DVD and on Redbox.

Netflix

Matthias Schweighofer conducts and stars in “Army of Thieves” (2021, TV-MA), a heist thriller starring Nathalie Emmanuel.

True Stories: The Edgar Wright Documentary “The Sparks Brothers” (2021, R) profiles the cult rock band Sparks and their founders, Ron and Russell Mael.

TV Streaming: Saweetie and a positive sex puppet troupe present “Sex: uncompressed” (TV-MA), using humor to explore human sexuality.

Amazon Prime Video

“Fairfax” (TV-MA) is an adult animated comedy about four Los Angeles college kids trying to establish their cool credentials.

HBO Max

In “Women are losers” (2021, TV-MA), a bright and talented Catholic schoolgirl (Lorenza Izzo) in the 1960s in San Francisco overcomes obstacles to chart her own future.

Issa Rae returns for fifth and final season of award-winning series “Unsafe” (TV-MA).

Other flows

‘Vera’ creator Ann Cleeves writes the mystery of the limited series “The long call” (unrated), starring Ben Aldridge as a police detective whose first murder case takes him to his hometown. (BritBox)

The limited series “Nox” (France, 2018, TV-MA, with subtitles) is a crime thriller that plunges a bank robber and the police into the sewers and tunnels beneath Paris. (Topic)

New on disc and available at Redbox

“The Suicide Squad”, “Stillwater”, “Don’t Breathe 2”, “On the Rocks”

Sean Axmaker is a Seattle film critic and writer. His reviews are available on streamondemandathome.com.

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It’s time to admit that Aquaman is DC’s sexiest superhero https://fabricadecosas.org/its-time-to-admit-that-aquaman-is-dcs-sexiest-superhero/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 22:54:42 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/its-time-to-admit-that-aquaman-is-dcs-sexiest-superhero/ As unlikely as it sounds given its history as the target of entire schools of talking to fish jokes, fans are craving Aquaman – and I mean dried. (Image credit: DC) Since Newsarama announced DC’s impending Aquamen event (likely a team between classic Aquaman Arthur Curry and new Aquaman Jackson Hyde), fan reaction has undoubtedly […]]]>

As unlikely as it sounds given its history as the target of entire schools of talking to fish jokes, fans are craving Aquaman – and I mean dried.

(Image credit: DC)

Since Newsarama announced DC’s impending Aquamen event (likely a team between classic Aquaman Arthur Curry and new Aquaman Jackson Hyde), fan reaction has undoubtedly been enthusiastic – and not just for the details of the event. story.

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How to tell if sex abusers are in your Trick-or-Treating route https://fabricadecosas.org/how-to-tell-if-sex-abusers-are-in-your-trick-or-treating-route/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 22:06:34 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/how-to-tell-if-sex-abusers-are-in-your-trick-or-treating-route/ Before your kids grab their plastic pumpkins and go out to pick up candy this Halloween weekend, you might want to know if there are any sex offenders in their path. In Wyoming, as well as many other states, law enforcement agencies work with OffenderWatch – the nation’s largest sex offender registration system – which […]]]>

Before your kids grab their plastic pumpkins and go out to pick up candy this Halloween weekend, you might want to know if there are any sex offenders in their path.

In Wyoming, as well as many other states, law enforcement agencies work with OffenderWatch – the nation’s largest sex offender registration system – which can be accessed through the Wyoming Department of Criminal Investigation website.

Wyoming Criminal Investigation Division

The site allows you to see all offenders posted within a specified radius of your home, business, school or other desired address.

You can also locate offenders by first or last name and city of residence.

A search of “Cheyenne” – the largest city in the state – found 396 offenders, 174 of whom have home addresses within two miles of the Wyoming State Capitol.

Wyoming Criminal Investigation Division

WATCH: How Halloween Has Changed Over The Past 100 Years

Stacker has compiled a list of ways Hanime Halloween has changed over the past 100 years, from the way we celebrate it on the day to the costumes we wear. We’ve included events, inventions, and trends that changed the way Halloween was celebrated over time. Many of these traditions were gradually abandoned. But just like fake blood in a rug, every part of Halloween history left an impression that we can see traces of today.

SWEET: Here are the most popular Halloween candies

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Does Netflix’s “Inside Job” Encourage Anti-Semitic Conspiracy Theorists? – Before https://fabricadecosas.org/does-netflixs-inside-job-encourage-anti-semitic-conspiracy-theorists-before/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 20:30:58 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/does-netflixs-inside-job-encourage-anti-semitic-conspiracy-theorists-before/ The Jews are the source of most of the major conspiracy theories. A secret cabal running the government? This may be a principle of QAnon these days, but it is the origin of the “Protocols of the Elders of Zion,” an invented hanime pamphlet purporting to detail the Jewish plan for world domination. Bloodsucking lizards? […]]]>

The Jews are the source of most of the major conspiracy theories. A secret cabal running the government? This may be a principle of QAnon these days, but it is the origin of the “Protocols of the Elders of Zion,” an invented hanime pamphlet purporting to detail the Jewish plan for world domination. Bloodsucking lizards? This one is made up of a bit of slander and a mishmash of stereotypes about Jewish immigrants to the United States being less than human.

All of these are, of course, wrong. Except in the world of Netflix’s new cartoon, “Inside Job.” There, a secret cabal rules the world, killing JFK, replacing the president with a robot, and faking the moon landing (sort of, it’s actually a sex colony now). Cognito Inc., as the cabal is known, is funded by – you guessed it – blood-drinking lizards.

A cynical but whimsical adventure in the mold of “Rick and Morty”, the series indulges in many common conspiracy theories, sneering at the ignorance and manipulability of the public – exactly what true conspiracy theorists fear.

On Twitter, some feared that the show would encourage anti-Semitic beliefs. After all, it shows how the Deep State controls the media, sowing outrage on Twitter to distract us from the real cabal work. A guy whose all job is to invent and distribute pathogens is a no-brainer.

But the show also makes it hard for anyone to really believe these things; there is nothing like a mainstream animated show to shatter dangerous beliefs. Moreover, none of the characters in the series are Jewish or even coded as such; one is a weird dolphin hybrid, the other is a mushroom alien and the others include a brother from the WASP-y fraternity, a black woman who runs the media, and a doctor who is only brilliant when he’s stoned. Reagan, the socially awkward main character and team boss, is voiced by Lizzy Caplan, who is Jewish, but the character has no sign of being a member of the tribe – no mention of a bat mitzvah or even demanding parents who want her to marry a doctor.

The show’s real commentary is about corporate America’s soullessness. Even Cognito’s Deep State Company responds to an even bigger secret cabal – an obscure board of directors, which looks a bit like the “Squid Game” guards. Many episodes revolve around having to chat with reptiles for funding, take mandatory awareness training, or avoid layoffs. Reagan has dedicated his life to his career, but is never promoted; meanwhile, thanks to her stubborn ambition, she has no friends and no romantic life to speak of.

The show has plenty of missteps – one episode that seems to poke fun at Asperger’s diagnosis, for example, was particularly tasteless, and many of the jokes seem one-dimensional. But he never strayed too far from the legitimization of a conspiracy theory.

There are a few things that could be interpreted as fodder for anti-Semitism, if you really look. Hollywood turns out to be full of disguised lizards, including Mark Zuckerberg. But Taylor Swift and Queen Elizabeth II are reptiles too – hard to imagine fewer Jewish celebrities. Additionally, if you were a staunch conspiracy theorist, you would likely see a cartoon usurping the Deep State as a Deep State controlled plan to redirect anyone who gets too close to the truth. (In this case, however, you’re probably a lost cause.)

Instead, the most dangerous aspect of the show might be that it portrays conspiracy theories as stupid. As absurd as it sounds, these kinds of false beliefs can lead to real world damage. Yet there is nothing that stops a bully like laughing in his face.

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NEWS: Episode 2 and later of World’s End Harem anime is postponed until January [1/3] – Forum https://fabricadecosas.org/news-episode-2-and-later-of-worlds-end-harem-anime-is-postponed-until-january-1-3-forum/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/news-episode-2-and-later-of-worlds-end-harem-anime-is-postponed-until-january-1-3-forum/ See previous topic :: See next topic Author A message 09jcg Joined: Sep 19, 2006 Posts: 119 Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 8:49 PM It seems REAL late in the game to postpone it. I wonder if the content was too extreme for the broadcasters? As for the western version, it really looks like something […]]]>
See previous topic :: See next topic Author A message 09jcg

Joined: Sep 19, 2006
Posts: 119

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 8:49 PM Reply with a quote

It seems REAL late in the game to postpone it. I wonder if the content was too extreme for the broadcasters? As for the western version, it really looks like something that would have been more comfortable on Hi Dive than crispy.

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DRosencraft

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Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:11 PM Reply with a quote
I must admit that I have no knowledge of the source material. The description, however, feels more like a hentai plot than a mainstream anime, so I wonder how it got promoted to such a level. I have a little faith that at the time this could have been done as a mostly harmless romcom, but given the hanime‘s penchant for the past half-decade to be as straightforward as possible, I don’t. don’t see that going somewhere meaningful.

It’s curious that it was withdrawn the day before the launch. The content issue is a seductive culprit, but it’s not a streaming service that goes offline, but the whole series is delayed for a season. It looks more like a production glitch, and quite significant and sudden, considering it was only retired the day before launch. You’d assume that at least the first few episodes are in the box, so there would have to be something wrong with an episode early enough that they felt like there was nothing they could do about it. repair in time.

Back to the top MagicPolly

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Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:21 PM Reply with a quote

Looks like they’re trying to avoid another interspecies reviewer situation, and I don’t blame them

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Key

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Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:21 PM Reply with a quote
DRosencraft wrote:
I have a little faith in the fact that at the time it could have been done as a mostly harmless romcom. . .

I read the first volume of the manga. It takes itself far too seriously to be suitable for a romcom setup.

Quote:
It’s curious that it was withdrawn the day before the launch. The content issue is a seductive culprit, but it’s not a streaming service that goes offline, but the whole series is delayed for a season. It looks more like a production glitch, and quite significant and sudden, considering it was only retired the day before launch. You’d assume that at least the first few episodes are in the box, so there would have to be something wrong with an episode early enough that they felt like there was nothing they could do about it. repair in time.

Yes, the timing is so odd here (has a series ever been delayed a season less than 24 hours before its scheduled debut?) That it asks for more details.

Back to the top Greed1914

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Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:26 PM Reply with a quote
MagicPolly wrote:
Looks like they’re trying to avoid another interspecies reviewer situation, and I don’t blame them

Yeah, that’s my guess. Considering the hardware and how late it is, it looks like it’s a delay to censor a lot or the risk that some networks will pull it.

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Covnam

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Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:30 PM Reply with a quote
Agree that this is probably a content issue causing the delay, unless the production is having serious issues. Maybe there is so much to censor that they ran out of light bars Laughing

It is also possible that the setting involving a virus outbreak is still considered a problem.

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Yune Amagiri

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Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:39 PM Reply with a quote

I don’t know why they waited until the last moment, but given that so many animes initially dated this season have been delayed, I wouldn’t rule out covid. I have read the manga and while there are some H borderline scenes, they are rarer than the synopsis might suggest and short enough to be cut entirely during production if necessary.

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Registration: June 17, 2019
Posts: 81

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:47 PM Reply with a quote
DRosencraft wrote:
so I wonder how it got promoted to such a level.

It is literally one of the best selling ecchi series right now.

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The Imperator

Joined: March 24, 2014
Posts: 468

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:48 PM Reply with a quote
If the problem is with the content, the usual “Hey, wanna see the steamy part in their uncensored glory? Just buy the comic!” special effects work?

They adapt this, knowing the plot and graphics perfectly well. Wouldn’t it be weird otherwise?

The expression “closely examine”, imo, implies serious production problems.

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Saiphaz

Registration: August 30, 2020
Posts: 51

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:52 PM Reply with a quote

Why was this green light given at the start? Those who want a normal story will be put off by this whole harem thing. Those who want obscene stuff will be put off by the fact that the MC is infuriatingly boring.

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09jcg

Joined: Sep 19, 2006
Posts: 119

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:00 PM Reply with a quote
Saiphaz wrote:
Why was this green light given at the start? Those who want a normal story will be put off by this whole harem thing. Those who want obscene stuff will be put off by the fact that the MC is maddeningly boring.

Does that make you wonder where the adaptation of Parallel Paradise is? I mean, if you’re going to adapt the charcoal, you might as well go all out …

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Change man

Joined: June 06, 2018
Posts: 183

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:16 PM Reply with a quote

Guys, this kind of anime only reaches its true potential on AT-X and it had already been confirmed that there would be an age restriction there. Have you ever forgotten about kaifuku?

In other words, on other stations there might only be a blank screen that doesn’t matter.

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Hiroki not Takuya

Joined: Apr 17, 2012
Positions: 1845

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:28 PM Reply with a quote

Damn i was so ready to see the protag impregnate as many women as physically possible too !! Crunchius Interruptus …

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SaleCasual

Joined: June 01, 2015
Posts: 1617

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:43 PM Reply with a quote

Is anyone dead?

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Change man

Joined: June 06, 2018
Posts: 183

Posted: Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:52 PM Reply with a quote
You all forget that several stations were willing to broadcast reviews.

Well, I understand that there are going to be a lot of theories on this. Maybe someone will even say that the Feminist Parliamentary League has struck again.

But I prefer to believe the simplest and the most probable; the animation must have been horrible in the last few episodes.

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Old-school anime on RetroCrush is worth watching https://fabricadecosas.org/old-school-anime-on-retrocrush-is-worth-watching/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/old-school-anime-on-retrocrush-is-worth-watching/ In a crowded market with streaming services, RetroCrush stands out with its library of mostly old animated series and movies, all available to stream legally and for free. Many of these anime classics were huge hits in the early years of the American anime fandom, but went out of print and into obscurity before their […]]]>

In a crowded market with streaming services, RetroCrush stands out with its library of mostly old animated series and movies, all available to stream legally and for free. Many of these anime classics were huge hits in the early years of the American anime fandom, but went out of print and into obscurity before their licenses were rescued by companies like Discotek. . Other classics never legally arrived in the United States at the time and only became available recently, allowing fans to finally fill in the gaps in their knowledge of hanime history.

There are plenty of great old school anime to explore on RetroCrush. However, for those looking for specific recommendations, the following five gems, listed in chronological order of publication, are great places to start. Whether you’re looking for action, sci-fi, comedy, or the most cuddly feeling of pain and hopelessness ever, these cartoons are the ones any fan interested in the history of the medium should check out. .


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Ringing bell

Ringing bell

Animated film by Masami Hata in 1978 Ringing bell certainly sounds like something viewers would expect from Sanrio, the merchandising company behind Hello Kitty. However, the actual film is manner darker than his cute character designs and family pedigree suggest. Things start off quite overwhelming when the main character, an adorable little lamb named Chirin, sees his mother being eaten by a wolf. The plot only darkens from there, as Chirin seeks revenge and decides to become as strong as a wolf himself.

Run 47 minutes at a brisk pace without a single moment of uplifting in the midst of history’s growing parade of misery, Ringing bell is a downright bizarre and utterly unforgettable visual experience that does not go beyond its welcome. The mismatch between the style and substance of the film is handled effectively – just make sure you don’t let little kids watch this unless you’re up for some really tough conversations.

Project A-Ko

Absolutely legendary among anime fans of a certain age, but largely ignored by younger generations, Project A-Ko is one of the craziest action comedies of the ’80s. It’s filled with both great animation and wacky pop culture parodies. The main character A-Ko is a super strong high school student who is supposed to be the daughter of Superman and Wonder Woman. She fights along with her wealthy classmate B-Ko for the affection of the innocent C-Ko, who is secretly an alien princess from a race of all-female aliens invading Earth.

Originally intended as a payment from the Lemon Cream hentai series but deemed so funny and of high quality that it warrants its own non-pornographic mainstream theatrical release on 1986 Project A-Ko the feature film received three shorter theatrical films as sequels. All four episodes of the main series are streamed on RetroCrush. The first film will also receive a 4K Blu-ray remastered from Discotek, which is slated for sale in December.

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Otaku no video

Otaku no video

Those interested in the history of Gainax animation studio and / or Japanese otaku culture should take the time to watch Otaku no video if they haven’t already. This two-part OVA, released in 1991, combines segments of anime and live action. The story of the anime follows an aspiring geek’s quest to become the “Otaking”, the ultimate otaku, and build an otaku-led model and an anime empire that is no different from one’s own ambitions. by Gainax. The live-action scenes feature fictional interviews with anonymous real-life otaku – all of whom are confirmed or suspected to be Gainax employees (including Neon Genesis Evangelion director Hideaki Anno).

Otaku no video was made following the arrest of Tsutomu Miyazaki, a serial killer whose horrific crimes that the media have decided to blame on the anime and manga. Being an otaku was not really socially acceptable before the Miyazaki murders, but in the late 1980s and early 1990s the anti-otaku stigma was stronger than ever in Japan. Otaku no video, with its mocking but ultimately loving portrayal of the anime fandom, served to reclaim “otaku” as a badge of honor rather than an insult.

Memories

The 1995 anthology film Memories, executive produced by Akira creator Katsuhiro Otomo, contains three short films, each of which are incredibly impressive and distinctive animated works. The first segment, “Magnetic Rose”, is the most famous of the three, and for good reason. Directed by master animator Koji Morimoto and written by a young Satoshi Kon, this mind-boggling sci-fi story follows a pair of astronauts responding to a distress signal, who find themselves traveling through memories recreated by AI from a deceased opera singer.

“Stink Bomb”, directed by The seven deadly sinsTensai Okamura, and written by Otomo himself, is a more comical story about a scientist who turns into a smelly bioweapon after accidentally taking experimental pills. The final short, “Cannon Fodder,” is both written and directed by Otomo and is a mind-boggling, dialogue-free exploration of military propaganda into a dystopian future, animated as if it were a continuous shot of 22 minutes.

Martian successor Nadesico

Creation in 1996, Martian successor Nadesico was part of the post-evangelization boom in the anime mecha. However, while other mecha series from the late ’90s tended to follow evangelizationleads in their more serious and esoteric narration, Nadesico was primarily a comedic celebration of an older super-mecha anime. While the story of a war between Earth and the “Jovian Lizards” offers stakes and drama, the darkness is counterbalanced by a cast of wacky characters who prefer to watch their favorite mecha anime, Gekiganger 3, than to pilot their giant robots.

RetroCrush airs both the original 26-episode series and its 1998 movie sequel, Martian successor Nadesico: The Motion Picture – Prince of Darkness. However, unlike the original series, the film relies heavily on the basic knowledge of the Sega Saturn video game spin-off of the series to make sense, and therefore sorely lacking in following the tone and storyline of the series. TV anime.

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My Hero Academia: What Is A Awakened Quirk - And Who Has Them?

My Hero Academia: What Is A Awakened Quirk – And Who Has Them?


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Redoing the uncensored version of the healer https://fabricadecosas.org/redoing-the-uncensored-version-of-the-healer/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fabricadecosas.org/redoing-the-uncensored-version-of-the-healer/ Redo the Healer, based on a Japanese novel titled Kaifuku Jutushushi no Yarinaoshi or simply Kaiyori written by Rui Tsukiyo, is about a healing wizard who is used and tossed about by fellow adventurers assuming that healers cannot fight on their own. However, when he acquires the Philosopher’s Stone, and “heals” the world itself, he […]]]>

Redo the Healer, based on a Japanese novel titled Kaifuku Jutushushi no Yarinaoshi or simply Kaiyori written by Rui Tsukiyo, is about a healing wizard who is used and tossed about by fellow adventurers assuming that healers cannot fight on their own. However, when he acquires the Philosopher’s Stone, and “heals” the world itself, he goes back four years to remake his life in revenge on those who mistreated him.

Oh, and did I mention that Redo the Healer sparked controversy for its mature themes, explicit sexual content, violence and rape? This is probably the main reason why it is more difficult to find ways to broadcast Redo the Healer, especially the uncensored version. The revenge-themed hanime is currently not available to stream on Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, Crunchyroll, and Funimation. The show has a censored version suitable for television, a “Redo” version only available for online streaming and an uncensored “Complete Recovery” version.

Where to look Redo the Healer uncensored version?

Redo the Healer is currently available for streaming on TO HIDE with dubbed and / or subtitled versions in English, Spanish, Danish, Swedish and Portuguese. its monthly subscription price is $ 4.99 USD or $ 47.99 per year, but it looks like only the censored version is currently available in its streaming service.

Currently, the uncensored version of Redo the Healer is only available to stream on other anime websites which we will not mention here as they are considered pirated. HIDIVE hasn’t announced plans to add the uncensored version to its library, but new subscribers can watch it for free if they confirm the 30-day free trial. We encourage viewers to pay for the content they consume.

For more information on where to stream, Redo the Healer, Click here.

What is the Difference Between Censored and Uncensored Versions of Redo the Healer?

Obviously, the sex scenes in the censored version of Redo the Healer are toned down, censored with dark space. Many would consider this hentai anime because it features explicit sex scenes, threesomes, free torture scenes, and extreme violence with blood and gore.

According to Editors, the sex scenes in the uncensored version show boobs but not genitals, so they are considered softcore compared to hardcore hentai shows which actually show genitals, which means watching the censored version is pretty much like being offered a veggie burger when you really want the real beef.

Of course, many viewers prefer to watch the uncensored version as the censorship removes a lot of the explicit content depicted in the manga.

You can read my review of episode 1 of Redo the Healer here. For the full list of revelations Redo the Healer episode titles, Click here.

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